America is spending billions of dollars in a futile attempt to stop the stormy war clouds that are hovering over her concessions but she is not getting at the root cause of it.(Pt.2)

GREETINGS,

America is spending billions of dollars in a futile attempt to stop the stormy war clouds that are hovering over her concessions but she is not getting at the root cause of it. The reason why the cloud is rising with destruction is because of her so-called Negro slaves whom she refuses to let go. “–pg.206(O.S.H.A.)

…..” She boasts of her material and being able to destroy the people of earth thirty times. If she was left free to use her material maybe America could win, but the divine die was set against her long before she ever became America.”–pg.233(TFOA)

SHE MUST BE MADE TO COLLAPSE IN DISGRACE BEFORE THE FINAL OUTRIGHT DESTRUCTION! THIS IS NOW GOING ON. THIS IS WHY ALLAH HAS THEM TERRIFIED AND SPENDING TRILLIONS OF DOLLARS THAT THEY DON’T HAVE ,AND MUST BORROW.

On the war path: The nearly $1 trillion national security budget

Chris Hellman and Mattea Kramer, TomDispatch.com

Recent months  have seen a flurry of headlines about cuts  (often called “threats”) to the U.S. defense budget. Last week, lawmakers in the  House of Representatives even passed a bill that was meant  to spare national security spending from future cuts by reducing school-lunch  funding and other social programs. 

 

Here, then, is a  simple question that, for some curious reason, no one bothers to ask, no less  answer: How much are we spending on national security these days? With major  wars winding down, has Washington already cut such spending so close to the bone  that further reductions would be perilous to our safety?

In fact, with  projected cuts added in, the  national security budget in fiscal 2013 will be nearly $1 trillion — a  staggering enough sum that it’s worth taking a walk through the maze of the  national security budget to see just where that money’s lodged.

 

If you’ve heard  a number for how much the U.S. spends on the military, it’s probably in the  neighborhood of $530 billion. That’s the Pentagon’s base budget for fiscal 2013,  and represents a 2.5% cut from 2012. But that $530 billion is merely the  beginning of what the U.S. spends on national security. Let’s dig a little  deeper.

 

The Pentagon’s  base budget doesn’t include war funding, which in recent years has been well  over $100 billion. With U.S. troops withdrawn from Iraq and troop levels falling  in Afghanistan, you might think that war funding would be plummeting as  well.  In fact, it will drop to a mere $88 billion in fiscal 2013.  By way of comparison, the federal government will spend around $64 billion on education that  same year.

 

Add in war  funding, and our national security total jumps to $618 billion. And we’re still  just getting started.

 

The U.S.  military maintains an arsenal of nuclear weapons. You might assume that we’ve  already accounted for nukes in the Pentagon’s $530 billion base budget.   But you’d be wrong. Funding for nuclear weapons falls under the Department of  Energy (DOE), so it’s a number you rarely hear. In fiscal 2013, we’ll be  spending $11.5 billion on weapons and related programs at the DOE. And disposal  of nuclear waste is expensive, so add another $6.4 billion for weapons  cleanup.

 

Now, we’re at  $636 billion and counting.

 

How about homeland security?  We’ve got to figure that in, too. There’s the Department of Homeland Security  (DHS), which will run taxpayers $35.5 billion for its national security  activities in fiscal 2013. But there’s funding for homeland security squirreled  away in just about every other federal agency as well.  Think, for example,  about programs to secure the food supply, funded through the U.S. Department of  Agriculture. So add another $13.5 billion for homeland security at federal  agencies other than DHS.

 

That brings  our total to $685 billion.

 

Then there’s the international affairs budget, another obscure corner of the federal budget that just happens to  be jammed with national security funds. For fiscal 2013, $8 billion in  additional war funding for Iraq and Afghanistan is hidden away there. There’s  also $14 billion for what’s called “international security assistance” — that’s  part of the weapons and training Washington offers foreign militaries around the  world. Plus there’s $2 billion for “peacekeeping operations,” money U.S.  taxpayers send overseas to help fund military operations handled by  international organizations and our allies.

 

That brings  our national security total up to $709 billion.…..MORE HERE

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